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20100430
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
right now, and like all things, this comes with a cost. nbc's lee cowan starts us off tonight from l.a. lee, good evening. >> reporter: well, brian, this ends debate that lasted nearly a decade about auto pollution that started right here on the roads of california. now that these so-called clean car standards are going to be mandatory across the board, it makes it the first time ever the federal government limited greenhouse gas emissions. it was 1975 when the government first put fuel economy standards in place, back when cars looked like land boats and got 13 miles to the gallon. >> you get more power. >> reporter: technology made cars a lot less thirsty, but the average auto's appetite is too much for the white house. so by 2014, the government will mandate cars and light trucks bump their average up to over 35 miles a gallon it's projected over the lifetime of those newly-regulated vehicles, carbon dioxide emissions will be reduced by 960 million metric tons. >> that's like taking 58 million cars off the road for an entire year. >> reporter: environmentalists are hailing the mov
company along the way. and wait until you hear what happened next. our story tonight from nbc's lee cowan. >> reporter: the waves were calm. the journey, long. some 40 miles of ocean between catalina island and the california coast. with nothing but a board, a paddle and a purpose. >> i just wanted to any ed ted e and do something that was big and a little bit overwhelming to think about. >> reporter: that was the point for surfer jodie nelson. to experience standing up to something scary. just the way her best friend is standing up to breast cancer. >> to see such an amazing friend risk her life like that for me is nothing but inspiring. >> reporter: her crossing was maents to raise money for cancer research. on her board, names of survivors. including jodie's own mom. all the motivation she needed, she thought. but then, nearly 20 miles out, something truly extraordinary happened. that turned jodie's floating odyssey from inspirational to magical. out of that pacific blue surfaced a 30-foot menke whale. rare in these waters. rarer still he joined in jodie's marathon for two hours. >> i
to this story. so to be faithful to scouting, we asked our own lee cowan to scout out the rest of the story. >> reporter: whether it's a tiger, a cub or an eagle, scouting remains a rite of passage. has been for 100 years. >> boy scouting is one of the few institutions to balance the rather softening effect of our modern way of life. >> reporter: most of us took that to mean not letting microwaves replace campfires or gpss out of reading a compass. rebound those father/son pinewood derbies? only the basics were allowed, gravity and good design. which is why many were surprised to learn the boy scouts of america suddenly found merit in video games. >> one of my kids said, i've been training for this my whole life. >> reporter: cub scout den leader brian winkleman was just as surprised as some of the members of his troop. >> this is fun. i get something for this. wow! >> reporter: the editor of "camping life" magazine, a former boy scout himself was left scratching his head. >> it does seem to encourage a lack of outdoor activity to push them back toward the computer. >> reporter: if you thin
street journal" headline put it today, "goldman just can't say it is sorry." we asked lee cowan to find out what americans far from wall street were saying about what they'd heard. >> reporter: there weren't torches and pitch forks but in several cities angry crowds made it clear that goldman sachs is the latest frankenstein on wall street. >> they got a bailout and are levels the ceos, cfos. >> reporter: frustration is a kind word. contempt seemed more apt. goldman's appearance on capitol hill yesterday certainly didn't help. >> how much of that [ bleep ] deal did you sell? >> you are the bookie. you are the house. >> you have lawyers, congressmen and bankers in the same room. that is like the trifecta of lying. how do you figure out who the best liar is there? my god. >> reporter: the anger isn't only over what goldman sachs did, betting homeowners couldn't pay their mortgages and profiting while the housing market tanked. >> how do you feel about destroying the american economy? >> reporter: the anger comes because of few executives find any of it wrong. goldman sachs ceo could barel
't think of it happening to a teenager. nbc's lee cowan reports on an 18-year-old beauty queen who died after a stroke. >> reporter: in the hawaiian islands, the aloha spirit is a way of life, and few, it seems, lived aloha better than cheryl wolf. >> every moment, every second we spent together, it was -- made things brighter. >> cheryl was amazing. just such a special person, and that's why i loved her so much. >> reporter: she was always photogenic, cute as a baby, stunning as a young woman. she entered two beauty pageants and won, both times. >> congratulations! >> reporter: she was going for her third crown next month, miss hawaii teen world. but then -- >> i guess god had other plans for her. >> reporter: just 20 minutes after her father dropped his queen off at school, the 18-year-old suffered a massive stroke. >> all of a sudden, everybody was in shock. >> reporter: she stayed conscious for a while. >> remember the bumblebee pageant? >> reporter: and her father says she remained herself. >> her head was hurting a lot. she was still being humorous when she was awake. that was jus
, the killer is get nothing but sympathy from the town and the prosecutors. here is lee cowan. >> hi no idea that our neighbor was, you know, the kind of guy that would rape kids. >> reporter: mindy used to live next door to a boy scout leader. she trusted mcneil, just like her brother, aaron, trusted him. but last february, aaron, now an adult, drove to this remote trailer and shot mcneil, point blank. with a pistol. >> was there ever a time you looked at your brother as a murderer? >> no. i -- when i look at aaron, i see -- i see a sad little boy that needs help. >> reporter: the crime was shocking for his family. not as shocking as his motive. aaron alleged mcneil molested him for years. start when he was just 11. and continued stalking him even after became a parent. >> i think aaron thought that his child would be next. i think that he snapped. >> reporter: as the story started spreading around town, so, too, did the rumors aaron might not be mcneil's only victim. at least 12 other boys, now men, came forward with similar accusations. but there was no one left to prosecute there were al
of those he'll never meet. for today, lee cowan, nbc news, los angeles. >> that is some incredible video. and as of this morning, more than $113,000 has been raised. >> so she more than met her goal. and this is the interesting part a a lot of that money came from simple $10 donations. >> if you had seen that whale, would you have started paddling faster? >> and i would have been, like, look at that? i would have been getng out of there. >>> coming up, sorting out the myths and realities of sex addiction. ♪ who's that lady? ♪ who's that lady? ♪ sexy lady ♪ who's that lady? [ female announcer ] new swiffer sweepervac does more than sweep. it has a powerful vacuum to suck up the big stuff. and electrostatic dry cloths to pick up the rest. it cleans better than a broom or your money back. [ slurping ] ♪ we get double miles on every purchase. so we earned a ski trip twice as fast. we get double miles every time we use our card. ( thuds ) i'll take this. ( crashing ) double miles add up quick. and all of those. so we brought the whole gang. one adult, one goat please. it's hard to b
was helped even more by some unexpected company along the way. lee cowan has that story. >> reporter: the waves were calm, the journey long. some 40 miles of ocean between catalina island and the california coast. with nothing but a board, a paddle and a purpose. >> i just wanted to go out there and do something that was big and a little bit overwhelming to think about. >> reporter: that was the point, for surfer jody nelson, to experience standing up to something scary, just the way her best friend is standing up to breast cancer. >> to see such an amazing friend risk her life like that for me, it's nothing but inspiring. >> reporter: her crossing was meant to raise money for cancer research. on her board, names of survivors, including jody's own mom. all the motivation she needed, she thought. but then, nearly 20 miles out, something truly extraordinary happened. that turned jody's inspirational odyssey to -- >> he joined in jody's marathon, for two hours. >> i was pretty certain that was not normal behavior and then when he would blow those bubbles up, i could smell his breath and
's lee cowan. >> reporter: in court he is referred to as jack doe, number power. testifying about as an 11-year-old boy scout in the early 1980s which he says was anything about a character building experience. >> grabbed my hand. put it up into his shorts. >> reporter: talking about his former scout leader. a convicted child molest or who admitted to abusing otheroy scouts in the past. >> the boy scouts started realizing after they were formed in 1910 they had a problem with guys getting into scouting that should not be with kids. >> reporter: over the years, confidential memos, the boy scouts of america dubbed, the proceed version files began filing up. thousands of pages documenting thousands of molesters the organization hoped to track to keep out of scouts. >> what they were hope for was everybody hoped for especially in the '70s and '80s was to get the molester to go away and hope nobody talks about it. >> boy scout sing one of the few institutions to balance the rather softening effect of our modern way of life. >> reporter: the boy scouts of america turned 100 this year. s
in an appearance on the "today" show this morning. lee cowan has the latest. >> reporter: baby gabriel's first birthday sles than two weeks away and no one knows whether he is alive to celebrate it or not. his mother, elizabeth johnson, is behind bars. charged with gabriel's kidnapping. his father, logan, has been looking for gabriel for four long months but hasn't found a trace. >> we just want to say to whoever may have him to just please, we really want him back. >> reporter: police say it started last december when johnson allegedly took gabriel from his home in tempe, arizona, and drove all the way to be san antonio, texas. it was there that she offered bone-chilling news to gabriel's father. police say she told him that she smothered gabe reel and thrown his body in a san antonio dumpster. >> she didn't like it that we had broken up and that she thought that i was trying to take him away from her. but actually i wasn't. we were both fine with shared custody. >> reporter: investigators say that she told them she actually had given gabriel away for adoption. transaction one investigator th
exclusively to gabriel's father in just a moment. but first, here's nbc's lee cowan. >> reporter: baby gabriel's first birthday is now less than two weeks away and no one knows whether he is alive to celebrate it or not. his mother, elizabeth johnson, is behind bars, charged with gabriel's kidnapping. his father, logan, has been looking for gabriel for four long months but hasn't found a trace. >> i want to believe that he is alive. i just want her to tell the truth. >> reporter: police say it all started last december when johnson allegedly took gabriel from his home in tempe, arizona and drove all the way to san antonio, texas. it was there she offered bone-chilling news to gabriel's father. police say she told him that she had smothered gabriel and had thrown his body in a san antonio dumpster. investigators, along with a team of volunteers, sorted through more than 4,000 tons of trash looking for clues. >> we don't want to leave any of it uncovered. >> reporter: but after more than two weeks, found nothing that hinted of a homicide. that may have backed up gabriel's mom's other story. inve
. nbc's lee cowan has the latest. >> reporter: it was only ten blocks. barely a ten-minute walk from her home in greeley, colorado. but the birthday party 1212-year-old kayleah wilson was supposed to attend -- >> taking it day by day, trying to stay strong and positive and not go totally batty. >> reporter: more than 40 investigators, including agents with the fbi, have been searching all week. but have come up empty handed. they say there's no witnesses, no surveillance tape, and no new clues. >> about all you can do is put your head down, dig in some more and go after more leads, possibilities. >> reporter: the path she may have taken to the birthday party seems obvious enough. including a tunnel going under a freeway. it would be the only place she wasn't in public view. >> someone must have seen her. you know? but it's just sad that they don't know where she's at. >> reporter: a facebook page has been set up asking for prayers and information. and police have gone back to re-interview family and friends, just in case kayleah may have taken off on her own. but even that seems unclear.
the town is rallying around the shooter. we'll talk to his sister in a moment, but first nbc's lee cowan has the details. >> reporter: it's picture postcard perfect. how could anything go wrong here? but behind the picket fences of ft. bragg, california, lay one town's dark secret. >> i had no yesterday that our neighbor was the kind of guy that would rape kids. >> reporter: mindy used to live next door to a boy scout leader named darryl mcneal. she trusted mcneal, just like her brother, aaron vargas, trusted him. but last february, aaron, now an adult, drove to this remote trailer and shot mcneal point-blank with a pistol. was there ever a time that you looked at your brother as a murderer? >> no. when i look at aaron, i see a sad little boy that needs help. >> reporter: the crime was shocking for his family. not as shocking as his motive. aaron alleged mcneal had molested him for years, starting when he was just 11 and continued stalking him even after he became a parent. >> i think aaron thought that his child was going to be next and i think he just snapped. >> reporter: suddenly, aa
lawsuit tied to sexual abuse. as nbc's lee cowan explains, one former scout says they are proof that the organization could, and should, have done more to protect boys all across the country. >> reporter: in court, he's referred to as jack dough number four. testifying about his time as an 11-year-old boy scout back in the early '80s which he says was anything but a character-building experience. >> he grabbed my hand and slid it up his leg, into his shorts. >> reporter: he's talking about his former scout leader, a convicted child molester who admitted to abusing other boy scouts in the past. >> the boy scouts started realizing soon after they were formed in 1910 that they had a problem with guys getting into scouting that should not be working with kids. >> reporter: over the years, confidential memos the boy scouts of america dubbed "the perversion files" began piling up. thousands of pages documenting thousands of alleged molesters the organization had hoped to track to keep out of scouting. >> what they were hoping for was what everybody hoped for especially in the '70s and
who have had too much work. here's nbc's lee cowan. >> reporter: it was one of those hollywood moments made famous by a single word. >> plastics. >> reporter: plastics. career advice in "the graduate," a career necessity for many in hollywood. for decades, plastic surgery helped keep countless stores employed. a nip here, a tuck there. augmentations a plenty. but these days, some in hollywood are rethinking plastic. maybe mother nature got it right after all. >> when it is obvious to a producer that someone has had a lot of plastic surgery, we've dempbtly seen them reject that actor based on that fact. >> reporter: these two women are casting director for "mad men," and say hollywood's new look is the natural look, or at least not the freshly refurbished. >> it surely is one of the instances where bigger is not better. >> if we can't tell, then it doesn't matter. it is when you can tell that it becomes an issue. >> reporter: meryl streep and helen miran are celebrated for aging gracefully. but there are plenty of websites that highlight hollywood face lifts they claim have flopped. ken
if hawaii tragically discovered it week. here's nbc's lee cowan. >> reporter: in the hawaiian island, few lived aloha better than sheryl wolfe. >> every moment, every second we spent together was -- made things brighter. >> sheryl was amazing. just such a special person. that's why i loved her so much. >> reporter: she was always photogenic, cute as a baby, stunning as a young woman. she entered two beauty pageants and won. both times. >> congratulations! >> reporter: she was going for her third crown next month, miss hawaii teen world. but then -- >> i guess god had other plans for her. >> reporter: just 20 minutes after her father dropped his queen off at school, the 18-year-old suffered a massive stroke. >> all of a sudden everybody was in shock. >> reporter: she stayed conscious for a while. >> remember the bumble bees? >> reporter: and her father says she remain herself. >> her head was hurting a lots. she was still being humorous when she was awake. that was just sheryl. >> reporter: but soon, the awake moments faded and a week later sheryl's eyes closed for good. her pageant sister
designers today who started off at a pinewood derby as a scout. lee cowan, nbc news, los angeles. >> that is -- >> just depressing. >> cue stop saying that? >> he's adorabldorable. i like him. >> rubbing sticks together? >> we'll be right back with more "morning joe." ♪ [ male announcer ] it's rollback time at walmart. now even on faded glory, which has been completely re-engineered for quality with soft, organic cotton... better fits... and lockstitch seams. and because everyone deserves clothes guaranteed for quality, we've rolled back the price. faded glory. one of thousands of rollbacks at walmart. save money. live better. walmart. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 to help with my investments. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 if i could change one thing... tdd# 1-800-345-2550 we'd all get a ton of great advice tdd# 1-800-345-2550 just for being a client. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 i mean, shouldn't i be able to talk about my money tdd# 1-800-345-2550 without it costing me a fortune? tdd# 1-800-345-2550 if i had my way, tdd# 1-800-345-2550 investment firms would be falling all over themselves tdd# 1-800-345-
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)